• Affordable

    Thorium is one of the most energy-dense elements found in nature spread over all the continents in large quantities. Abundant and efficient, can Thorium offer an affordable energy source?

  • Safe

    Are there safe methods of using Thorium with no risk of meltdowns or explosions? Can Thorium also be proliferation resistant?

  • Proven

    Research into the use of Thorium started in the 1960’s in the US government's atomic lab. Was it already then proven as a superior fuel?

  • Clean

    Reactors fuelled by Thorium create zero-emission energy. Is a drastic waste reduction in both amount and lifetime enough?

  • Sustainable

    If affordable, safe and clean, does Thorium offer a sustainable solution to the world’s energy problem?

  • Conference

    Turning Talk into Action! The best and brightest speakers in the field in a world class location – was ThEC13 in Geneva at CERN unique or can we build on it?

  • ThEC13
  • ThEC13 in Geneva at CERN

News

Live Video from ThEC13 in Geneva

For those who could not join us at ThEC13 in Geneva, we invite you to join us via Live Video below:

Live Video from ThEC13 in Geneva at CERN

Press Release: ThEC13 in Geneva at CERN

“Energy is a major concern for society and I’m sure that this conference will show once again how fundamental research can help to address such an important challenge” said Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General.

Thorium Research Center in Norway

The new government in Norway has announced a plan to establish a thorium research center.
This is not because commercial production of energy based on thorium is needed in Norway. Indeed, Norway is predicting an energy surplus for the next 20-30 years. But Norway holds an estimated 4 percent of the world’s thorium reserves, and politicians have been arguing whether these resources should be made accessible to the world.

Thorium Loses Weight

How much does Thorium weigh? This might seem an easy question to answer but when an atom has isotopes and is slightly radioactive it gets complicated. If you are not into details, this is not for you.

Program Updated 2013-09-18

The Program for ThEC13 in Geneva at CERN has now been updated. Please find the Program at the link below:

Thorium Energy Conference Program - ThEC13 in Geneva at CERN

This is a tentative program. Program updates will come shortly. If you have recommendations please send them to info@itheo.org

Looking forward to meeting you at ThEC13 in Geneva at CERN

Facts About Thorium from LiveScience

Did you know that thorium was formed in the cores of dying stars through the r-process, and supernovas eventually scattered it across the galaxy?

LiveScience has put together a “Facts About Thorium” page with lots of facts and you find it here.

Introducing the Dedicated Thorium Energy Conference Website

There will be 280 participants, world famous contributors, a visit to the unique detectors at CERN and a banquette at the famous Hotel President Wilson in Geneva. The Thorium Energy Conference needs a dedicated website.

www.thoriumenergyconference.org

Program Announcement - ThEC13 in Geneva at CERN

The Program for ThEC13 in Geneva at CERN is now available. Please find the Program at the link below:

Thorium Energy Conference Program - ThEC13 in Geneva at CERN

This is a tentative program. Program updates will come shortly. If you have recommendations please send them to info@itheo.org

We look forward to seeing you at ThEC13.

Power of a Norse God – Thorium Test Begins

They say it can reduce the danger of nuclear proliferation, make the spent fuel storage problem easier to handle and produce energy at the same time. The Scatec solution: add some thorium!

Hallden reactor open for loading thorium test fuel.

Molten Salt Reactor – Is it worth it?

The Engineer has an article in which Stuart Nathan argues for and against Molten Salt Reactor technology, and whether it should receive the substantial investments it needs.

‘They can do things that other reactors just can’t do. There are so many advantages over other systems, but equally there are difficulties and you shouldn’t underestimate them.’

Kevin Hesketh, senior fellow in reactor physics and nuclear fuel cycles at the National Nuclear Laboratory.